Five Hong Kong Restaurants to Try

Hong Kong offers many amazing, top-tier restaurants as well as other, more affordable eateries of all types, not just Chinese food (as a Torontonian, I consider myself very spoiled when it comes to authentic Chinese cuisine.  To the point that I can’t name any Canadian-Chinese style eateries that serve egg rolls and crunchy “noodles” that claim to be “chow mein.”)  Over the course of my trip, I’ve been able to dine at many different places, including:

Hainan chicken rice from The Peak Lookout

The Peak Lookout:  Located in an old house away from the two main complexes at Victoria Peak, this restaurant has a relaxed vibe with its high ceilings and indoor or outdoor seating. Sitting outside is highly recommended as it has a gorgeous panoramic view of Aberdeen.  The restaurant serves a variety of Asian cuisines as well as western food, there’s something for everyone.  Highly recommended is the Hainan chicken rice and vegetarian curry.  (121 Peak Road, The Peak. (852) 2849 1000)

Pan fried rice crepes (jeen cheung fun) from Fook Lam Moon

Fook Lam Moon: If you want to schmooze with celebrities (whether financial tycoons, government officials or media darlings), this is the place to go.  A standard Cantonese restaurant, this place serves dim sum at lunch.  Look for “media” (read: paparazzi – Hong Kong is a tabloid-obsessed society, probably thanks to the British).  Food is just above average in general, but the pan fried cheong fun (rice crepes) is very good.  Plus you might bump into someone famous. (Shop 3, G/F, Newman House, 35-45 Johnston Road, Wanchai (852) 2866 0663)

Pan fried noodles from Chiuchow Garden

Chiuchow Garden: Owned by Maxims, this restaurant serves food from the Chiuchow (Teochow) region of China.  A coastal area, this place is known for seafood and a regional congee (rice cereal) that is much thicker than the Cantonese version.  Items to note at this restaurant include”bucket rice” – more or less Chiuchow risotto, which is made with meats and a deliciously savoury sauce and their pan-fried egg noodles. Look for tiny cups of very, very strong tea at the end of the meal. (Shop 202, Hutchison House, 10 Harcourt Road (852) 2536 0833 plus other locations)

Okinawa Black Sugar ice cream with coffee jelly from Xi Yan Sweets

Xi Yan Sweets: This is not just a dessert place and unlike the typical restaurant operated by a celebrity chef, this place is actually affordable.  Dishes are a play on traditional Chinese cuisine, with a bit of modern western influence.  When I was there for lunch, I shared two appetizers with my dining partners, including the choy sum salad with dried scallop and deliciously tangy dressing.  The desserts are quite interesting as well, with many fusion-style choices such as a black sugar ice cream with coffee jelly. (Shop 1, G/F, 8 Wing Fung Street, Wanchai (852) 2833 6299)

Outside dining area at Mijas

Mjias: This is one of four restaurants located in the Murray Building at Stanley Market.  The Murray building was once an officers’ barracks, but has now been converted to a tourism spot.  The set, three course menu, which includes a tapas course, soup or salad and main is highly recommended.  The best thing about the restaurant is that the portions are European sized, meaning that a three-course meal isn’t that bad.  Sitting outside, on the verandah, where you can get a view of the area is better than sitting inside the restaurant.  (Shop 102, 1/F, Murray House (852) 2899 0858)

Some things to note about restaurants in Hong Kong – cold, municipal water is generally not served to guests at western restaurants. Some might give slightly cooled down boiled water, while others won’t serve anything at all – instead expecting guests to order bottled water, soft drinks or alcohol.  Of course, tea is the default drink at Chinese restaurants.  Also, don’t expect cloth or paper napkins at non-high end Chinese restaurants.  These places will provide wet napkins, but we highly suggest that you bring tissues.  In many restaurants, a 10% gratuity is included.   Finally, it’s not uncommon for staff to stand behind a guest while he or she is paying, rather than leave and then come back.  This is good if you’re in a hurry, but not if you want to analyze the bill before paying.

About Cynthia Cheng Mintz


Cynthia Cheng Mintz is the founder and webitor-in-chief of this site and the petite-focused site, Shorty Stories. She has also written for other publications including the Toronto Star and has blogged for The Huffington Post. Her first novel, Aspirations, was published in 2007. Outside of writing, Cynthia researches and advises philanthropic ideas for family funds and foundations and also volunteers.

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Cynthia Cheng Mintz

Cynthia Cheng Mintz is the founder and webitor-in-chief of this site and the petite-focused site, Shorty Stories. She has also written for other publications including the Toronto Star and has blogged for The Huffington Post. Her first novel, Aspirations, was published in 2007. Outside of writing, Cynthia researches and advises philanthropic ideas for family funds and foundations and also volunteers.