On the Whole United Airlines Leggings Issue

I grew up with strict dress codes.  In fact, I wore a school uniform for seven years.  I wasn’t allowed to wear make-up, save for grub day (when we were allowed to wear “normal” clothing for $1 or $2) and earrings were limited to studs and small hoops (“keepers”).  No nail polish either.  And guess what?  That’s the way I like things.  To this day, I try to look fairly neat and I don’t really wear “dangly” or “shower curtain” (read: big hoops) earrings.  And I also try to look put-together, yet comfortable when I travel.  And despite my pro-dress code stance, I thought the whole United Airlines/leggings controversy was a tad bit weird.

Unlike most people, I don’t consider most dress codes, sexist.  They’re usually there for a reason and there for both males and females.  However, what I DON’T understand is the dress code required for family members of United employees.  Unlike a school group (for example), the general public won’t know that the individuals are “representing the organization” (“representing the school” was what we were often told by faculty) in public when they’re travelling – only people at the gate, flight attendants, etc… would know – anyone handling boarding passes and other flight information.  So really, what difference does it make to other passengers?  It’s one thing if they looked like slobs – slobs suck and there are way, way, too many these days.  However, leggings and a t-shirt/other long top can be neat (yes, I’m on #teamleggingsarepants – as long as the top is long and covers one’s behind.  Otherwise, it stays in the gym).  In fact, it’s a standard uniform for me several days a week (I take yoga, barre and Pilates, after all!!!). 

I’m going to stop here.  I don’t want to spend an entire post talking about dress codes and what I think of them.  That’s something for a different day and a different post.   All I’m going to say is this:  our society, in 2017, is too casual. 

 

 

Image credit: connel/Shutterstock

About Cynthia Cheng Mintz


Cynthia Cheng Mintz is the founder and webitor-in-chief of this site and the petite-focused site, Shorty Stories. She has also written for other publications including the Toronto Star and has blogged for The Huffington Post. Her first novel, Aspirations, was published in 2007. Outside of writing, Cynthia researches and advises philanthropic ideas for family funds and foundations and also volunteers.

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Cynthia Cheng Mintz

Cynthia Cheng Mintz is the founder and webitor-in-chief of this site and the petite-focused site, Shorty Stories. She has also written for other publications including the Toronto Star and has blogged for The Huffington Post. Her first novel, Aspirations, was published in 2007. Outside of writing, Cynthia researches and advises philanthropic ideas for family funds and foundations and also volunteers.